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  1. #1
    Junior Member reirei702's Avatar
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    Eczema Sufferers

    I was browsing the forum and I noticed there were other members who have the same skin condition that I do, Eczema, so I started this thread for help and to help others.

    I've been to dermatoligsts forever and there has been very little help in this skin condition. There is no cure at the moment for this and is related to allergies as well as auto immune disorders. I've been frustrated and I know many others must be as well. It's depressing and can make you feel helpless at times but I think any amount of information is better than none.

    Signs you have Eczema:
    Skin is Itchy
    Skin is VERY dry and sometimes flaky
    Skin is rashy looking and in patches
    Skin is raised in areas and red (this is usually called a Flareup, the time before it gets even drier and itchier)

    Medicines that help Eczema:
    Benedryl is my NUMBER 1 Eczema fighter. I SWEAR BY THIS. When your skin is FLARING, take 1 or 2 tablets of Benedryl IMMEDIATELY. Within a couple hours you might feel tired and sleepy because of the Benedrul but your skin won't be so red anymore. I've realized that layers of foundation and concealer don't work with embarassing Eczema Flareups. It just makes your skin look drier and flakier than it is. If you don't want to take benedryl because of it's sleepy side effects, I suggest finding other ANTI Histamines at your drug store that don't make u feel like so.

    Medications prescribed by doctors:
    Cortisone Creams, sometimes you can buy this over the counter but other doctors can give you ones with a higher dosage. I particularly don't use this so much because it isn't strong enough for my eczema.

    Triamcinolone, this has steroids in it and is only suggested for use on the body NOT the face

    Elidel, you can use this on your face and does not contain steroids.

    My Suggestions

    I suggest when using Cortisone, Triamcinolone or Elidel to ask your doctor for OINTMENTS and not creams because Ointments absorb better in your skin

    One other thing I tried is attaching a very good shower head filter in my shower. People don't realize what's in their TAP water. Chlorine is one of them and Chlorine DRIES skin and to others cause skin irritations.

    Applying Eucerin Cream thickly on my face before bed and right after showers help a lot. I sometimes put this cream on 10-20 minutes before applying my makeup so my skin isn't so dry. People with eczema KNOW that most makeup moisturizers barely do the trick, so I suggest this along with a new moisturizer. I mostly put this around around my eyes because thats where it's the driest.

    Don't use perfume or lotions with perfume, even my doctor said that fragrant things can cause skin irritation.

    Hope this Helps! Feel Free to add more tips

  2. #2
    Senior Member ben's Avatar
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    i am currently using an ointment which called tacrolimus, it's a newer treatment and has offered me more releaf than any others i have tried.

    here's some info which i cut & copied from netdoctor:

    Tacrolimus

    Tacrolimus was originally developed as an immunosuppressant medicine used for dampening down the immune system after organ transplants. It is still given both by mouth and by injection to people who have had a kidney or liver transplant to prevent their immune systems rejecting the transplant.

    Tacrolimus ointment is a further development of this active ingredient for the local treatment of eczema.

    Tacrolimus ointment is known scientifically as a topical immunomodulator. While it is not fully understood how it works in eczema, its effect in the skin is similar to pimecrolimus.

    It has been shown to prevent the production of cytokines by T-cells in the skin. It is also known to prevent the release of inflammatory chemicals called basophils and eosinophils from mast cells and white blood cells.

    Like pimecrolimus, it suppresses inflammatory reactions in the skin.


    These new non-steroid medicines are not regular treatments, but are used to control flare-ups of atopic eczema as and when they occur.

    They have been shown to be very effective at reducing inflammation in atopic eczema, with most people experiencing greatly reduced itching after the first three days of treatment.


    i ended up paying around $80 for a 30 gram tube but i feel it is totally worth it. as long as i apply it everyday, 2 times a day it does help to reduce the redness and flare-ups. the only downside is that i cannot go out into the sun if i have applied this ointment unless i am covered up, and in the summer that is a big pain.

    i have also found that AVEENO SKin Relief Moisturizing Lotion works to combat the itch. i apply to my skin after the tacrolimus.

  3. #3
    Senior Member ben's Avatar
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    another product i use is called PREVAX. this is an over the counter protectant cream that contains 67% petrolatum and microcrystalline wax.

    i apply this to the areas of my hands that are effected and while it does not reduce the redness it prevents the areas from becoming more irrated when i wash my hands or i am working with food.

  4. #4

  5. #5
    ugh i hate this... I have a patch on my left arm, and for the longest time had one on my shin on my right leg.

    Not sure what caused it, how I got it, or whatever. it just appeared one day on my leg, and the one on my arm poped up shortly after that. The spot on my leg lasted for over a year (it's gone now), and I still get flareups on my left arm. Although not as bad as before.

    I just had a prescription cortison cream and that helps. Putting a bandaid over the spots on my arms to seal in the moisture helped a lot too when it was really really bad.

  6. #6
    Senior Member jessiekins1's Avatar
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    man, i'd rather have it on my arms and legs than my decollete. by boobs *were* one of my best features.
    bow down before the one you serve!

  7. #7
    in the winter...the eczema on my hands gets so bad, it weeps. It's disgusting, and since I work in a restaurant and have to wash my hands 57,8340 a day, all I do is aggravate the hell out of it.

    the only thing that works for me is an ointment (prescribed) called Elocon. I wear gloves to bed after I put it on because I don't want my hands to weep all over the sheets. Plus, it really helps the ointment sink in.

  8. #8
    yeh my arms and legs did that for a while.. they were gross and had a clear liquid that came out of em when they are at their worst.

    My legs have been clear for over a year now, and very minor flareups on my arms, not sure what caused it to go away, but i'm sure glad it did. I feel for all the people who have it in more sensitive locations =(

  9. #9
    Senior Member mzcelaneous's Avatar
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    My daughter and I have it, though mines is far worse. I have an Rx for Triamcinolone Acetonide Cream (0.5%) and it works like a charm on myself (I don't have any patches on my face, so I don't need to worry)& Elidel works great on my daughter. For prevention, I slather on Aquaphor right after the shower and it defintely decreases eczema reaccurences. People say petroleum jelly works just as well, but personally, I feel that Aquaphor moisturizes WAY better.

    One more thing that a lot of people cannot stand, but works, is taking showers every other day and do not use hot water. Hot water is too harsh and strips your body of it's natural moisturizers. Gross to some, but I've done it since I was a child and it's one of the main things that curbs my flare ups. HTH!
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  10. #10
    Senior Member glueme's Avatar
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    I have Eczema all over my body, and have been prescribed Westcort cortisone creame for my face. It's weaker than anything for the body, so it works fine on my face and neck.

    I've been using it for my body but lately (past year) my flareups have gotten worse, so I think I'm going to ask for something stronger.

    It's true, I take showers every other day too, and I try not to use hot water (tough it's hard to resist in the cold mornings!)

    I also rub body oil into my skin after my shower when I'm still wet (Neutrogena Sesame Body Oil), pat dry, then slather myself in creme. It seems to help.

    Thank you for the shower head tip--I didn't even think about Chlorine!!

  11. #11
    OMG!!!!! I can relate to Eczema, I minds usually flare up when I where costume jewerly, so it's around my neck, on my wrist and it flares up on my face and other areas.

    The doctor recommend for me is Lidex, it's a an ointment, that works very well, just make sure to get the gel instead of the cream base, because it doesn't work as good. But it will clear up the rash and the itching. Also, it is a steroid.

    Another good moisturizer that good to keep you skin from getting dry, is LUSH Dream Cream, which is to die for . It's very good, and a little will goes a long way.
    "Love never fails"

  12. #12
    Senior Member LineausBH58's Avatar
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    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jessiekins1
    man, i'd rather have it on my arms and legs than my decollete. by boobs *were* one of my best features.

    thats where i have it.... it's so sad... but I use stuff(tri something) and it goes away)

  13. #13
    I used to have really bad eczema, it covered my collarbones, patches on my arms and legs in random places, on my cheeks, and (in my opinion, the worst place ever) my eyelids.. which made them puffy, red and scaly. No makeup for me I tried lotions, creams, antihistamines.. all were very minmal help. If I stopped taking pills or applying the cream, it would come back.

    The best thing I ever did was remove start taking a look at my diet.. and the things I was eating around the time of a flare-up. I realised that if I consumed grapefruit in any way, shape, or form.. including juice.. I'd have a breakout of ezcema the next day. So all that time, I had been contributing it to not enough moisturiser, or using cheapie eyemakeup, or taking a scalding hot shower without moisturiser afterwards.. and it had nothing to do with any of those. I took all grapefruit out of my diet, and everything cleared up and I haven't seen a spot of ezcema since.

    I really reccommend watching your diet to see if it *is* food related, because it could save you a lot of hassle. I am much happier without grapefruit than I would be if I was taking meds everyday. Another thing you can have done is a scratch test at the dermatologist.. they can also be really helpful with telling you what foods to avoid. A lot of people are allergic to wheat and don't know it. They eat it every day and then wonder why there's stuff wrong with them. :/

    Hope this helps!
    Laura

  14. #14
    Senior Member glueme's Avatar
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    Quote:
    Originally Posted by nicemeka
    Another good moisturizer that good to keep you skin from getting dry, is LUSH Dream Cream, which is to die for . It's very good, and a little will goes a long way.

    Is it scented?

  15. #15
    Lush Dream Cream!! It's excellent for people with excema. I don't suffer from it but my friend does and after I gave it to her it's GONE. It smells like lavendar and calamine, I personally HATE the scent but for the results it's dealible and it's not too "loud" and I cover it up with dusting powder.

  16. #16
    Junior Member reirei702's Avatar
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    Another thing I just discovered (and I'm going to try) is Eucerin's Redness Relief creams. There is a kit on their website that deals with the facial redness. It also comes with a green cream that supposedly neutralizes the color so your face isn't so red.

    Since my biggest problem is mostly the redness, I'm gonna try and see if that works. Lately I've been using normal liquid foundation and Bare Ecentuals powder foundation on my face to cover it up. It works pretty good too! I just want to see if it'll make anything better.

    Also, Girlstar was right, what you eat does effect your allergic reactions. I seriously break out when i eat beef or when I'm around cats. I strongly suggest an allergy test too just to minimize what causes flareups. I've done a lot better since.

  17. #17
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by glueme
    Is it scented?

    Yes, it has a lavender scent to it, it smells good.
    "Love never fails"

  18. #18
    Reirei, try Perscriptives Magic Foundation Primer in Red Neutralizer before your foundation, it really covers the red!!

  19. #19
    Junior Member reirei702's Avatar
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    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ette
    Reirei, try Perscriptives Magic Foundation Primer in Red Neutralizer before your foundation, it really covers the red!!

    D'oh! I knew I should of stopped by this site earlier today... I passed by a Sephora today and could of got it! Thanks, I'm definately gonna buy one. Do you use it? and does it work for you?

  20. #20
    Yeah, it works so well.

  21. #21
    Senior Member MAChostage's Avatar
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    Quote:
    Originally Posted by nicemeka
    OMG!!!!! I can relate to Eczema, I minds usually flare up when I where costume jewerly, so it's around my neck, on my wrist and it flares up on my face and other areas.

    Is this actually considered eczema? I was always told that it's "contact dermatitis". I develop this very thing if, for instance, I go to sleep while wearing a sterling silver necklace. Sure enough, I awake with what appears to be a little rash on my neck. It goes away within a day or two.

    I do, however, have nummular eczema on my lower left leg. I went to two female dermatologists when I was trying to find out what was going on. One completely misdiagnosed me (she did a biopsy of the skin and came to the conclusion, with the help of the lab, that I had guttate psoriasis -- WRONG!! ) and the other seemed pretty indifferent in general. Neither of them ever prescribed anything for me (I was told to "just keep the area moist".). I eventually went to a male dermatologist who came highly recommended. He took one look at it, ran his hand over it (the other two dermatologists only peered at it from a distance) and said "that's easy, nummular eczema" and prescribed Triamcinolone. That was two months ago and my condition is almost completely gone, except for the hyperpigmentation that came about as a result of my scratching the area. That, he said, will eventually go away but could take as long as a year.

  22. #22
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MAChostage
    Is this actually considered eczema? I was always told that it's "contact dermatitis". I develop this very thing if, for instance, I go to sleep while wearing a sterling silver necklace. Sure enough, I awake with what appears to be a little rash on my neck. It goes away within a day or two.

    I do, however, have nummular eczema on my lower left leg. I went to two female dermatologists when I was trying to find out what was going on. One completely misdiagnosed me (she did a biopsy of the skin and came to the conclusion, with the help of the lab, that I had guttate psoriasis -- WRONG!! ) and the other seemed pretty indifferent in general. Neither of them ever prescribed anything for me (I was told to "just keep the area moist".). I eventually went to a male dermatologist who came highly recommended. He took one look at it, ran his hand over it (the other two dermatologists only peered at it from a distance) and said "that's easy, nummular eczema" and prescribed Triamcinolone. That was two months ago and my condition is almost completely gone, except for the hyperpigmentation that came about as a result of my scratching the area. That, he said, will eventually go away but could take as long as a year.

    I'm going to look into that because that sounds exactly what i'm dealing with. thank you.
    "Love never fails"

  23. #23
    Senior Member glueme's Avatar
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    What do you you guys use for body wash?

  24. #24
    Senior Member MAChostage's Avatar
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    I use Dove Sensitive Skin Body Wash. I also indulge in the various body scrubs that I love, though not in the area where the eczema is present, and I thoroughly rinse afterward.

  25. #25
    Senior Member mzcelaneous's Avatar
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    Quote:
    Originally Posted by glueme
    What do you you guys use for body wash?

    Johnson & Johnson's moisturizing body wash (the pink bottle) or Aveeno's moisturizing.
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  26. #26
    One thing I have found helpful in holding off flare ups is using the skin cream Xerand. It's made by La Roche Posay, and it costs $12 for a 75 ml / 2.55 fl oz tube. My dermatologist recommended it to me. It works by restoring the skin's protective lipid barrier, which makes it especially good for frequently washed hands, and extreme weather conditions. It really helps keep my skin from becoming dry and irritated.

    Here is a bit more information on Xerand from the official site: http://www.laroche-posay.us/productdetail.html?pid=27
    [I don't think this qualifies as a prohibited e-commerce link, because the page I linked to is not from an online store; it is just an informational page. Sorry if I am mistaken.]

    It can be purchased from several places online, such as skin-etc and dermstore.

  27. #27
    Senior Member syrene78's Avatar
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    Yes, I know this cream. It is actually very good. I remember buying and using it very often when I was living in France. I used it for my very dry hands as I couln't stand any other braands which burnt my skin because of the fragrance or the composition.
    But I didn't know that you could use it for the excema too!
    I think that CVS now carries some La Roche Posay products. They are very good as very rich in Thermal water from the Alps.
    Same as the brand Avene that I love too!
    Try it, even for very dry hands!
    Steph

  28. #28
    Senior Member MarniMac's Avatar
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    This is kind of an avant garde suggestion...but I've been living with excema my whole life and I could honestly write a book on everything I have tried...after dermatoligist treatments of all kinds, my excema just comes right back...a year ago, I got fake (acrylic) nails, and it really helps control my excema, I guess because I scratch in my sleep, and the nails are really dull, so it helps to break the "itch, scratch" cycle.
    I also reccomend a good, hearty moisturizer (dream cream is the bomb, but I only use it on my face...it is GREAT for making fine lines and wrinkles dissappear also).
    Another suggestion is to apply your moisturizers while your skin is still damp from your shower. I really like Curel Ultra Healing body lotion...it works really well for me. I actually do a cocktail of the Curel, Sarna lotion and cortisone cream. You have to be careful with longterm cortisone cream use, because Dr.'s say that it can cause skin atrophy, meaning that your skin will no longer work properly.
    I think that Vitamin E and tons of water also help...as does working out, but make sure you rinse off in the shower afterward bcs sometimes your own sweat can cause an excema flareup.
    One last thing...Clinique makes a face cream "Incredibly soothing cream for upset skin"...its fantastic.
    Tyra called and said my makeup looks fierce

  29. #29
    Senior Member Katja's Avatar
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    I've had excema all my life, but the horrible patches (notably behind my knees and on my arms) went away completely after I was 12. It was weird. The doctor always prescribed the Triamcinolone, and it soothed it a lot. I haven't had to use it since.

    Funny you post this though. I moved to St. Louis about 3 years ago, and this past summer I had this uncontrollable itching all over my body. I assumed it was due to new developed allergies. EVERYDAY I was itching. I started taking 1 Benedryl every night to ease my itching. I don't itch anymore due to the medication, BUT I don't like having to take Benedryl everynight. I always wondered WHY I was itching and what the cause was. I'm going to discuss this w/ my doctor next month, but my latent excema might be back to haunt me in a different way. Thanks for bringing that idea to mind.

  30. #30
    Senior Member syrene78's Avatar
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    Did you ever think that you could be allergic to Iode?
    The Iode is found in the sea.
    That has nothing to do with excema but some people are allergic.
    Whether it is when you it to much shellfish or go on a very salty beach, then the day after you feel very itchy all over your body or on a particular spot. Then you have a rash and it itches like hell...
    I know, I have had this allergy since I was born...
    You need to take Zyrtec, that's what is most efficient to me at least.
    And speak to your GP about it and get tested.
    If you ever take a scanner, you must absolutely tell them that you are allergic to Iode as it is what they inject in your blood (in huge quantities) as a maker and it can be very harmful to you then.




    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Katja
    I've had excema all my life, but the horrible patches (notably behind my knees and on my arms) went away completely after I was 12. It was weird. The doctor always prescribed the Triamcinolone, and it soothed it a lot. I haven't had to use it since.

    Funny you post this though. I moved to St. Louis about 3 years ago, and this past summer I had this uncontrollable itching all over my body. I assumed it was due to new developed allergies. EVERYDAY I was itching. I started taking 1 Benedryl every night to ease my itching. I don't itch anymore due to the medication, BUT I don't like having to take Benedryl everynight. I always wondered WHY I was itching and what the cause was. I'm going to discuss this w/ my doctor next month, but my latent excema might be back to haunt me in a different way. Thanks for bringing that idea to mind.

    Steph

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