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"Ethnic" magazines always confuse olive skin with golden or tanned.

post #1 of 73
Thread Starter 
I hope this is the right board for this little rant. Is it just me, or do most magazines for "ethnic" women confuse olive complexions with golden or tanned? I know most people use the word "olive" to refer to any yellowish medium skintone, and that's okay, but a true olive complexion is noticably sallow, has cool undertones, and sometimes purplish lips. Seems like many magazines, including ones geared toward minorities, try to be inclusive by including recommendations for olive skin, but most of their recommendations are better suited to golden skin tones or lighter women with tans. I wonder how many olive skinned women are wearing bright orange lipstick because they heard it would bring out their "tan" tones. I've even seen this problem many times in Latina magazine! Also, I know this seems silly, but can anyone who cares about this as much as I do please write a respectful message to the Latina magazine beauty editor on the proper use of the term "olive". Sometimes I seriously wonder if the magazine's latina editors are just figure heads. Their beauty editor is a beautiful, stylish women with a very typical olive skin tone, but the orange lipstick example I gave comes partly from them, among many other terrible recommendations. I really love their idea of always catogorizing beauty products by skintone, but it's strange that they would make some of these suggestions for a skintone that the vast majority of their readers (and editors) probably have.
post #2 of 73

Re: "Ethnic" magazines always confuse olive skin with golden or tanned.

Amen! I get customers all of the time telling me that they have "olive skin" when they absolutely do not!
post #3 of 73

Re: "Ethnic" magazines always confuse olive skin with golden or tanned.

I go to their website to read the beauty articles. I'm neither "olive" or "caramel" (as they group) so I just assume I can use either recommendation.

It irritates me when non-ethnic mags do something similar thing. They will go from fair-olive-dark, and their dark will be all over the place. Their dark can range from Rhianna's skintone, Halle Berry's,Mary J Blige's, or Missy Elliott's.


Not being Latina myself I ask, Who is considered "olive" in the Latin community? JLo?
post #4 of 73

Re: "Ethnic" magazines always confuse olive skin with golden or tanned.

Yeah, some people just know of one "type" and then they make up all of the rules for that type that they possibly can (whether it's true or not). I'm not olive but I sure do get the "you have darker skin you must be NW45 or 47" (when right now I'm about a NC45 just because it's summer).
post #5 of 73

Re: "Ethnic" magazines always confuse olive skin with golden or tanned.

this annoys me too! cuz i am a lighter skinned woman of color w/ a skin tone closer to alicia keys, rhianna's, and even jessica albas, so i usually read what they recommend for "golden" or "olive" skin tones, but then i see they put beyonce in the "dark skinned" category, and i'm sorry, but beyonce is not dark skinned! what about alek wek or african american ladies w/ truly dark skin? if beyonce & rhianna are as dark as the mags recognize, what does this say about all the women who are MUCH darker than them?!
post #6 of 73

Re: "Ethnic" magazines always confuse olive skin with golden or tanned.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JamaicanDiva2 View Post
this annoys me too! cuz i am a lighter skinned woman of color w/ a skin tone closer to alicia keys, rhianna's, and even jessica albas, so i usually read what they recommend for "golden" or "olive" skin tones, but then i see they put beyonce in the "dark skinned" category, and i'm sorry, but beyonce is not dark skinned! what about alek wek or african american ladies w/ truly dark skin? if beyonce & rhianna are as dark as the mags recognize, what does this say about all the women who are MUCH darker than them?!
Thank you, thank you for saying this and very well-said....Hollywood or any beauty editor or writer who make up the rules seem to think only the women you mentioned are "dark" and we (anyone darker than they), apparently, don't count or are even thought about. I can remember hearing of the problems Diahann Carroll had in the 50s and 60s w/MUAs saying that they can use the same colors on her that they used on Lena Horne:confused:....

Here we are in the 21st Century and are still trying to get MUAs, cosmetic companies, beauty editors and the like to "SEE" and hear us.
post #7 of 73

Re: "Ethnic" magazines always confuse olive skin with golden or tanned.

you're welcome! It has bothered me for awhile now, because whenever i read the "golden" skinned options, i look & see they've classified my skintone as "dark," and while this would not bother me if i truly was dark, it bothers me b/c i'm like "Ok - FYI Beyonce & Rhianna are not the darkest women of color! In fact, in their culture (our culture), they'd be considered much more lightskinned! Halle Berry is NOT dark skinned!

It's just saddening the ignorance that still exists in our world today. . . because these magazines that try so hard to prove that they are not racist, by having women of color models & beauty sections that supposedly meet our needs too, are still touting the ancient false belief that lighter is better. . .
post #8 of 73

Re: "Ethnic" magazines always confuse olive skin with golden or tanned.

Those magazines are just not being specific enough with their word choice. Terms like "olive" or "dark" are so widely permeated and ill-defined in the cosmetics industry that it seems everybody has a different idea of what they represent. For me, I no longer rely on words -- just look at the pictures! If the model/actress/whoever looks like they have about the same skin color as I do, then it's all systems go.
post #9 of 73

Re: "Ethnic" magazines always confuse olive skin with golden or tanned.

I wish they would have a little legend at the side, which showed fair-light light-med, med-dark etc., and show us a picture example of what they think that category is. It would be really quick and simple, and then we would know "okay, in that mag, I'm a light/med, but in this one I'm a fair/light."
post #10 of 73

Re: "Ethnic" magazines always confuse olive skin with golden or tanned.

I found this thread through Google, but I have to say it is a good topic. I have such a hard time finding foundations that match me, because I am African-American, so when MAs see me coming they want to put me in a color like Nia Long or someone darker. But because I am yellow-green straight up, I look darker. Plus my skin is sensitive, so wiping my makeup off at the counter so they can match NEVER comes out well. I always have to wait till I get home and start from scratch with a sample.

Without makeup I look ill, pale, and almost deathly. Add in the darkness around my prominent eyes, and I look like Data from Star Trek, lol. So finding makeup that makes me look human is super important to me.

Following trends/tips for makeup in magazines has never worked for me. Thank goodness for Specktra.
post #11 of 73

Re: "Ethnic" magazines always confuse olive skin with golden or tanned.

....


Edited by Sojourner - 1/15/14 at 7:21pm
post #12 of 73

Re: "Ethnic" magazines always confuse olive skin with golden or tanned.

I've always been confused with this and I'm glad this thread cleared it up. Olive skintones are very cool and I've noticed mostly Mediterranean and Middle-Eastern/South Asian people have a true "olive skintone".

I would consider my grandmother, who is Israeli, Sicilian, and Danish, to have an olive complexion. My dad also is olive toned but he is out in the sun all the time and his tan usually masks it.

Same goes for me. If I don't get any sun, I look like this strange mix of yellow, green, and brown. It's very difficult to find foundations cool enough for me when my skin gets that pale. :/
post #13 of 73

Re: "Ethnic" magazines always confuse olive skin with golden or tanned.

Yeah, I don't go by magazine suggestions. Their dark is always reallly dark or someone of Rihanna's color when I think a good amount of us are in between those shades.

Quote:
Originally Posted by chocolategoddes View Post

Same goes for me. If I don't get any sun, I look like this strange mix of yellow, green, and brown. It's very difficult to find foundations cool enough for me when my skin gets that pale. :/
I have the hardest time with foundation. A lot of the time I will find a foundation that blends into my color really well, but it's it too red. It's like, "If this was yellow based it would be PERFECT." I swear, every foundation, the color that matches me the most is always red based. But the shade lighter is always the yellow based one (but that color is always too light). I think I finally found my match though - the Revlon Custom Creations in the darkest one they have (or at least the darkest one I've seen) on number 5. I remember liking the MUFE HD but I can't remember if it turned me red or not. The Mat Velvet definitely does!
post #14 of 73

Re: "Ethnic" magazines always confuse olive skin with golden or tanned.

Quote:
Originally Posted by chocolategoddes View Post
I've always been confused with this and I'm glad this thread cleared it up. Olive skintones are very cool and I've noticed mostly Mediterranean and Middle-Eastern/South Asian people have a true "olive skintone".
/
Well, even for ME girls it depends on their ethnic mixing. I’m ME and I would say I’m considered beige or olive but my mom is essentially "white". I think the whole concept of race and colour is pretty messed up in this society. I remember when my family immigrated to Canada back in '91 I was surprised that ppl in North America thought white = Caucasian. This is so far from true. Caucasians can be darker or lighter, same as blacks or Asians. You don’t have to be a NC15/20 to be considered Caucasian, lol! It’s more about things like your skull shape, your likelihood to catch certain disease…than your skin colour. I think the whole idea of putting ppl in too many boxes in the north American society just contributes to more racism. Coz then it means too many ppl are different from each other, when in reality there are only 3 races and at the end we’re all humans :/

Anyway, back to the topic. I agree about the magazines mix-up too. I’ve even seen someone like Jennifer Aniston being considered medium. I thought medium would be someone like Freida Pinto. I would be a medium light and JA would be light.
post #15 of 73

Re: "Ethnic" magazines always confuse olive skin with golden or tanned.

I'm Latina, my mother and MUA's have all said I'm olive. I don't really know, this thread made me paranoid.

I noticed Latina magazine is pretty good with the whole olive/tanned thing. I don't really read many ethnic magazines other than that (the only ones around here besides Latina are ones like Ebony and Essence). So I haven't really noticed.

I have noticed however, non-ethnic magazines like someone else mentioned, Jennifer Anniston being considered medium.
post #16 of 73

Re: "Ethnic" magazines always confuse olive skin with golden or tanned.

thank you to the OP! I have 2 questions!

1) I always thought Olive kinda had a greenish tint to it, (like what Chocolate goddess said) is that the right way to describe it?
1.5) and does that mean that Olive skin would look good with Ash-toned hair colors (such as Ash Brown instead of Golden Brown)?

2)I feel like my skin has a looooot of yellow (personally, I don't see any green) so would that make me Olive or Golden?

t.i.a.!
post #17 of 73

Re: "Ethnic" magazines always confuse olive skin with golden or tanned.

ive always thought it pretty crappy that in magazines etc, there is reccomendations for extra fair, light, medium and dark skin tones, but their 'dark' is beyonce or rihanna... what about darker than that, the beauty industry, some of the cosmetics companies in england dont make products like foundations for anyone much darker than i would call medium, a lot of people with asian or latin skin tones and darker skin tones have to go some where special for their make up/read specific magazines..
whats up with that?
post #18 of 73

Re: "Ethnic" magazines always confuse olive skin with golden or tanned.

Quote:
Originally Posted by wifey806 View Post
thank you to the OP! I have 2 questions!

1) I always thought Olive kinda had a greenish tint to it, (like what Chocolate goddess said) is that the right way to describe it?
1.5) and does that mean that Olive skin would look good with Ash-toned hair colors (such as Ash Brown instead of Golden Brown)?

2)I feel like my skin has a looooot of yellow (personally, I don't see any green) so would that make me Olive or Golden?

t.i.a.!
Not the OP, but imo if you don't see any green at all, you're Golden.

When I go to counters to look at foundations, I like to swatch them on my hand before anyone even talks to me. If all I see is yellow, then don't bother trying to sell me something. It has to have some green in it or be a generic neutral base for me to even consider it.

My perfect matching foundations look ugly in the bottles, seriously [well, compared to golden ones]. Like "why would you want that on your face?!" ugly. Sallow, indeed.
post #19 of 73

I stumbled on this via google search as well.  Sorry to revive an old thread.  But I can't agree more.  I am caucasian (one parent with mediterranean complexion), and I believe I have very pale "olive" skin, as in a subtle greenish-brown undertone, NOT medium-depth warm toned skin.  My hairdresser is asian, and we talked about this.  She, like me, only looks good in cool tones, and you can see that although she is much darker complected than I am, we have similar undertones.  I think olive is a very confusing term.  But I try not to let anyone tell me what looks good on me.  As early as age 16, someone advised me that I had warm skin and should wear warm blush and lipstick.  I'm proud that I was confident enough in my color sense at that age to refuse to buy the products she was recommending.  I look terrible in terra cotta...

post #20 of 73

....


Edited by Sojourner - 1/15/14 at 4:44pm
post #21 of 73
I know I hate it too! But I don't agree with all the replies. African Americans no matter how light there skin is don't have an olive skin tone because just the shad of the color is different. Skin tones like Rihanna have their own category and it falls under brown, specifically caramel brown. Caramel and chocolate are under the brown category. A perfect example of an olive skin tone is Nina dobrev's. That is a true olive color. And olive can range from a little lighter to a little darker it all doesn't have to be one shade but what I hate is when big top magazines confuse fair or medium skin tones with olive, that's not olive! Example, Megan fox! She is NOT olive she is way too light for olive! I think native olive skin tones are of people from the middle east, central Asia, and eastern Europe like Turkey or Bulgaria, and maybe even Hispanics. Darker people falling into the olive category doesn't bother me, but lighter skin tones falling into the olive category bothers the HELL out of me! People who are fair or pale are like yeah I have olive skin it's like uh no you don't! You are not olive so shut up! One day, people who are obviously white are gonna start calling themselves olive and then us olives are going to be categorized as browns! Here are the skin shades, light/pale, fair, medium, olive, tan, brown, dark, and black. Light or pale is just pale like snow or pinkish like Anne Hathaway or Kate Winslet, fair is like leighton meester or maybe Miley Cyrus who have generally white skin, medium is like a beige or golden brown like Blake lively or Megan fox, OLIVE is like a golden BROWN/light brown to moderate brown from Nina Dobrev to Jessica Alba or Aishwarya Rai (known as "prettiest woman in the world), tan is like a moderate brown to a general brown like Freida Pinto and I'm a little hesitant on Eva Longoria because she could fall under the olive category too, brown is just your general brown from as light as Rihanna or beyonce to Tyra banks or maybe Katerina Graham and Jessica Szohr, then dark brown is like lil Wayne to jay z or Nikki minaj to Oprah or maybe some south Indians , and lastly black is like a very dark brown to black like Akon or some parts of India! And the reason why some olive skins can seem tan is because in hot weather, the skin turns tan which is a true olivian! People with medium might seem olive due to the climate but that's not a true olive, olives look pretty tan in hot climates. Now for me, I don't look at this as an opinion I think what I just said is a fact. I am an "olivian" and I have pretty good knowledge on skin tones and I've also heard people call me tan but those are people who don't know the difference. I think it's because they're judging based on ethnicity and I hate that, people who are stereotypical or just dumb do that.
post #22 of 73

I have an extremely green cast to my skin tone and I have always been put under the "olive category" my mother is indian and my dad middle eastern/indian.

I never know what to buy in foundation as nothing neutralizes the greenish cast?

post #23 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by Babybub10 View Post

I know I hate it too! But I don't agree with all the replies. African Americans no matter how light there skin is don't have an olive skin tone because just the shad of the color is different. Skin tones like Rihanna have their own category and it falls under brown, specifically caramel brown. Caramel and chocolate are under the brown category. A perfect example of an olive skin tone is Nina dobrev's. That is a true olive color. And olive can range from a little lighter to a little darker it all doesn't have to be one shade but what I hate is when big top magazines confuse fair or medium skin tones with olive, that's not olive! Example, Megan fox! She is NOT olive she is way too light for olive! I think native olive skin tones are of people from the middle east, central Asia, and eastern Europe like Turkey or Bulgaria, and maybe even Hispanics. Darker people falling into the olive category doesn't bother me, but lighter skin tones falling into the olive category bothers the HELL out of me! People who are fair or pale are like yeah I have olive skin it's like uh no you don't! You are not olive so shut up! One day, people who are obviously white are gonna start calling themselves olive and then us olives are going to be categorized as browns! Here are the skin shades, light/pale, fair, medium, olive, tan, brown, dark, and black. Light or pale is just pale like snow or pinkish like Anne Hathaway or Kate Winslet, fair is like leighton meester or maybe Miley Cyrus who have generally white skin, medium is like a beige or golden brown like Blake lively or Megan fox, OLIVE is like a golden BROWN/light brown to moderate brown from Nina Dobrev to Jessica Alba or Aishwarya Rai (known as "prettiest woman in the world), tan is like a moderate brown to a general brown like Freida Pinto and I'm a little hesitant on Eva Longoria because she could fall under the olive category too, brown is just your general brown from as light as Rihanna or beyonce to Tyra banks or maybe Katerina Graham and Jessica Szohr, then dark brown is like lil Wayne to jay z or Nikki minaj to Oprah or maybe some south Indians , and lastly black is like a very dark brown to black like Akon or some parts of India! And the reason why some olive skins can seem tan is because in hot weather, the skin turns tan which is a true olivian! People with medium might seem olive due to the climate but that's not a true olive, olives look pretty tan in hot climates. Now for me, I don't look at this as an opinion I think what I just said is a fact. I am an "olivian" and I have pretty good knowledge on skin tones and I've also heard people call me tan but those are people who don't know the difference. I think it's because they're judging based on ethnicity and I hate that, people who are stereotypical or just dumb do that.

 

I would not classify Megan Fox as medium. When she was in Transformers yes, but she had to tan for that role. Nowadays she is very pale and pink toned.

 

The true definition of olive is that your skin has a green cast, otherwise what would be the point of the word 'olive'?


Edited by Sojourner - 1/15/14 at 4:00pm
post #24 of 73

omg... this is waaaay confusing. I believe that I have olive undertones because yellow based foundations look ashy, pink/red tones change my coloring and never match.  Neutral shades make me look absolutely flat and dull.  So, all that's left is olive.  At times when I look at my chest and face I do see a green cast but only after I learned I could possibly have olive coloring.  when searching on google, I put in dark olive and pictures of jada pinkett and zoe saldana appear.  I don't really "see" undertones as in my eyes can't seem to capture the colors so I just memorize the skin tone of those that are said to be olive but also have deeper skin color.  I find out what foundations they use and start my matching around that shade.  I really hope this thread sheds more light on this topic because I have noooooo idea! as listed in my siggy, my foundation matches are all over the place so I have a hard time determining what shade range to try. blink.gif

post #25 of 73

I fully agree. I have medium deep olive skin as a black woman. I'm not dark but I'm not very light. I have so much gold and actually olive green in my skin it's noticeable. I have definitely noticed tan or golden or just slightly dark women have been referred to as olive. Olive skin actually has olive green tones in it which are obvious. The golden toned makeup with green in it are the best matches for olive skin people. As well as grayish green makeup.

post #26 of 73

I am not a woman of color, but I have read this in magazines and beauty articles too. It drives me nuts! How deep your skin tone is and it;s undertone are not the same thing friends! If you can't figure that out step away from the keyboard!

post #27 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by Babybub10 View Post

I know I hate it too! But I don't agree with all the replies. African Americans no matter how light there skin is don't have an olive skin tone because just the shad of the color is different. Skin tones like Rihanna have their own category and it falls under brown, specifically caramel brown. Caramel and chocolate are under the brown category. A perfect example of an olive skin tone is Nina dobrev's. That is a true olive color. And olive can range from a little lighter to a little darker it all doesn't have to be one shade but what I hate is when big top magazines confuse fair or medium skin tones with olive, that's not olive! Example, Megan fox! She is NOT olive she is way too light for olive! I think native olive skin tones are of people from the middle east, central Asia, and eastern Europe like Turkey or Bulgaria, and maybe even Hispanics. Darker people falling into the olive category doesn't bother me, but lighter skin tones falling into the olive category bothers the HELL out of me! People who are fair or pale are like yeah I have olive skin it's like uh no you don't! You are not olive so shut up! One day, people who are obviously white are gonna start calling themselves olive and then us olives are going to be categorized as browns! Here are the skin shades, light/pale, fair, medium, olive, tan, brown, dark, and black. Light or pale is just pale like snow or pinkish like Anne Hathaway or Kate Winslet, fair is like leighton meester or maybe Miley Cyrus who have generally white skin, medium is like a beige or golden brown like Blake lively or Megan fox, OLIVE is like a golden BROWN/light brown to moderate brown from Nina Dobrev to Jessica Alba or Aishwarya Rai (known as "prettiest woman in the world), tan is like a moderate brown to a general brown like Freida Pinto and I'm a little hesitant on Eva Longoria because she could fall under the olive category too, brown is just your general brown from as light as Rihanna or beyonce to Tyra banks or maybe Katerina Graham and Jessica Szohr, then dark brown is like lil Wayne to jay z or Nikki minaj to Oprah or maybe some south Indians , and lastly black is like a very dark brown to black like Akon or some parts of India! And the reason why some olive skins can seem tan is because in hot weather, the skin turns tan which is a true olivian! People with medium might seem olive due to the climate but that's not a true olive, olives look pretty tan in hot climates. Now for me, I don't look at this as an opinion I think what I just said is a fact. I am an "olivian" and I have pretty good knowledge on skin tones and I've also heard people call me tan but those are people who don't know the difference. I think it's because they're judging based on ethnicity and I hate that, people who are stereotypical or just dumb do that.

 

 

Sorry, hun, but as a Caucasian female with olive green undertones, I fully disagree with this statement. How fair or dark your skin is, is completely irrelevant to one's undertones. That being said, one CAN be just as fair as Anne Hathaway and Khloe Kardashian (perhaps even lighter), and still have an olive/green undertone to their skin. Just like a deeply tan person can have the rosy pink undertones, most people think of as fair skin. A cooler, fairer olive complexion tends to look "pale" or "fair" but with a more subtle hint of green, that shows more in the summer.
 
That being said here is a long list of FAIR SKINNED women that have OLIVE UNDERTONES just like myself:
Selena Gomez
Demi Lovato
Kris Jenner
Mila Kunis
Lucy Hale
Alyssa Milano
Angelina from the Jersey Shore
Elaine from Seinfeld
Lea Michele
Victoria Beckham
Jenni "JWOWW" Farley
Adriana Lima
Penelope Cruz
Catherine Zeta Jones
Sophia Bush
post #28 of 73

I don't think most people would see those women as fair though. Lucy Hale (and she seems pink-toned from candid pictures) and Sophia Bush (she does seem to be olive) are fair yes but the rest are more medium I think, I wonder what everyone else thinks? :)

 

I agree that it is possible to be very pale and olive but it's quite rare and often people just say they are olive when they are not because 'olive' is generally seen as a positive thing. I think the presence of that green tone is the definition, and you can't have any pinkness to your skin (not including cheeks/nose/eyes which are naturally prone to redness).

 

Also, I don't think Caucasian has much to do with it. If you believe in those classifications, Caucasian covers anyone starting at western Europe all the way across to India and from the Arctic down to North Africa.


Edited by Sojourner - 1/15/14 at 4:02pm
post #29 of 73

I agree with the term "olive" fully. You're right. I do think a fair toned olive person, like myself, appears to blend in with the other fair folks, especially when they leave their hair dark brown or black, but in the natural daylight, or when wearing certain colors (bright green, true red, purples), or when we highlight our hair or color it red, that's when the olive comes out. When I dye my hair red, people often think I went tanning, or my skin looks like it has more color. I guess it's the subtle hints of green.

 

I will admit I've been classed as "fair warm" or "golden" because of the yellow/green in my fair skin, and again, the fact that most people class olive as a medium/tan color, and have been told to wear foundations that are too yellow and earth toned makeup. My mom would tell me all the time how it made my skin look dirty. icon_eek.gif And she was right.
 

post #30 of 73

^^^

And I absloutly think Selena is just as light as Miley Cyrus, just with that olive green hue. I must be missing something then, what is the difference between being fair or pale, and just having light skin?

 

EDIT: Come to think of it, I'm not super ghostly, like I said, I'm positive I have that green undertone, because I've compared the forearms to darker olives and it literally looks like a paint swatch. It's the same undertone, different shades. Foundation is a pain and I've found them to either be too pink, too warm, or too yellow. I think I might just be more medium/light than fair.

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