Wetting shadows?

shabdebaz

New member
Ok, I heard a coworker of mine telling a customer today not to wet the shadows as this could ruin them. I thought applying shadows wet was a common practice -- either for applying a more intense colour or for lining the eyes. What's the deal??
 

swaly

New member
I love to use shadows wet, but unfortunately in the majority of the cases, applying water/a wet brush directly to the eyeshadow will cause it to change texture and develop a "crust" as it dries. For me––and moreso with my MAC shadows than any others, which is a shame––even using a slightly damp finger after showering can cause the crust to form. With my cheaper staple black eyeshadow, I reserve one half of the cake for dry application and the other half for wet...but in general, I don't think using moisture directly on the eyeshadow is a good idea...there are all kinds of problems with your makeup constantly absorbing water, first being the crust and second being that a damp environment will probably harbor more bacteria and such. That's my two cents.
 

absolut_blonde

New member
It really depends on the shadow. I can wet Satin Taupe and Beauty Marked with no noticeable impact on the finish but others like Sketch get a weird film on them. Usually I just 'reserve' a small part of the eyeshadow for wet use. Plus, scraping off the top outermost layer seems to get rid of the hard layer left behind.
 

kimmy

New member
it is a very common practice, but that doesn't really make it a good one.

like has been said, sometimes it will cause the shadow to develop a hard film. not all shadows do this though, it's really a trial and error thing.

but rather than taking the chance, i'd reccomend doing what absolut_blond said and just setting aside a small portion of the pan for wet use
 

user3

New member
Quote:
Originally Posted by absolut_blonde
It really depends on the shadow. I can wet Satin Taupe and Beauty Marked with no noticeable impact on the finish but others like Sketch get a weird film on them. Usually I just 'reserve' a small part of the eyeshadow for wet use. Plus, scraping off the top outermost layer seems to get rid of the hard layer left behind.


Quote:
Originally Posted by THE ANTHEM
it is a very common practice, but that doesn't really make it a good one.

like has been said, sometimes it will cause the shadow to develop a hard film. not all shadows do this though, it's really a trial and error thing.

but rather than taking the chance, i'd reccomend doing what absolut_blond said and just setting aside a small portion of the pan for wet use


Yup, I agree with both of these lovely ladies.
 

eyeshadowfreak

New member
MAC says their shadows aren't meant to be used wet.

That said, I'll usually load up the brush with shadow, then spray it with Fix + to apply it if I want a wet look. I'll generally do this for lustres that aren't as pigmented as regular shadows.

Also, I'll wet them to line, but in that case, I'll do what ablsolut_blond said, reserve a small space on the shadow so I won't ruin the whole thing. And I'll only use a damp brush.
 

xiahe

New member
i had someone tell me that they "carve" tiny bits from the e/s pots onto a small little tray, then mix it with water there...that way, your pot won't suffer any water damage...

you could also do what eyeshadowfreak suggested, which is to load the brush up with shadow then spray fix+ on it.
 

ruby_soho

New member
If ever I want to apply a shadow wet with mixing medium for example, I swirl my brush around in the shadow so it really builds up on the brush, then I mix it with the medium on a plate or something like that. Then if I need more shadow I wipe my brush off on a facecloth to get rid of the liquid. Applying a wet brush directly to an eyeshadow makes it turn hard like the ladies above said.
 

sigwing

New member
Wow....I guess I'm not that meticulous, and I know everyone here hates sponge applicators, but I use a pointy one to dampen and swipe in a small area at the side of my shadows I want to use as liners and it works fine. Has for years. It's not like I go out & about & people just can't stand looking at my face because they know I've used a sponge-tip applicator, a brush or my finger to put some kind of eyeshadow on. There are some shadows that just can't handle a damp applicator, like I've had happen with some Prescriptives, but MAC I've used for years, wet AND dry, and it does cause a spot on the shadow to dry/harden differently, but none of mine have ever been ruined. I realize I'm not as educated or experienced as everyone else here, but at least that's how I've done it & never had problems. I just keep the spot on the shadow that I press the applicator to limited to a very small area of it. I also don't have any mixing medium...just use plain water just like people have done with cake eyeliner forever. MAC eyeshadows are the best and any of them I want to line with have always gone on just great with a dampened liner applicator.
 

Sushi_Flower

New member
I used Fix+ on a brush and then dipped it into Mulch to use as a liner and it totally changed the look of the shadow where i did that, it became metallic and shiny looking and you can't see the 'grainy' look anymore. Only did this in a small area though and i don't really like Mulch so i'm not too bothered about it.
 

shabdebaz

New member
Thanks for the input girls! I don't want to be caught off guard if a customer ever asks a question about shadow wetting.
 

MAC_Pixie04

New member
i accidentally wet my new Slip Pink and now there's a big dark spot in the middle. So Yeah....I might try the spraying the already loaded brush with Fix + instead. My friend told me she uses lotion on her brushes before she applies her eyeshadow to intensify it and when I was at her house recently her eyeshadows and blushes look disgusting and her brushes are all stained and stuff. I wouldn't risk it. Do what the others have suggested, or even scrape a little off the top of the shadow and mix it on a plate or something.
 

Jude

New member
Quote:
Originally Posted by sigwing
Wow....I guess I'm not that meticulous, and I know everyone here hates sponge applicators, but I use a pointy one to dampen and swipe in a small area at the side of my shadows I want to use as liners and it works fine. Has for years. It's not like I go out & about & people just can't stand looking at my face because they know I've used a sponge-tip applicator, a brush or my finger to put some kind of eyeshadow on. There are some shadows that just can't handle a damp applicator, like I've had happen with some Prescriptives, but MAC I've used for years, wet AND dry, and it does cause a spot on the shadow to dry/harden differently, but none of mine have ever been ruined. I realize I'm not as educated or experienced as everyone else here, but at least that's how I've done it & never had problems. I just keep the spot on the shadow that I press the applicator to limited to a very small area of it. I also don't have any mixing medium...just use plain water just like people have done with cake eyeliner forever. MAC eyeshadows are the best and any of them I want to line with have always gone on just great with a dampened liner applicator.


Not everyone. My MAC Sponge Tip applicators are an essential component of my brush collection and they are used everyday.
 

sigwing

New member
YAY JUDE!

I didn't know if it was just me, but I have always had great luck dampening them & either swiping something on my eyelid & it really makes the color cling on more, plus have more ZAP! or use the pointy end kind for lining above & below. And I've never had a problem with ruining the surface as long as I just use the damp applicator on the side edges or a certain spot on the shadow & the rest is fine for a dry brush.

I'm glad to hear I'm in good company with this practice!
 

Jennifer Mcfly

New member
what i do is wet my brush (242) with water or mixing medium lightly and then just place it on the shadow along the metal rim (edge) with the brush upright and just wiggle back and forth w/o moving the brush this way you can load it up with color and in the process it makes it kinda creamy and doesn't do any damage to the shadow. i have done this with multiple shadows and they are all still in great shape.
 

VeganChick

New member
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jennifer Mcfly
what i do is wet my brush (242) with water or mixing medium lightly and then just place it on the shadow along the metal rim (edge) with the brush upright and just wiggle back and forth w/o moving the brush this way you can load it up with color and in the process it makes it kinda creamy and doesn't do any damage to the shadow. i have done this with multiple shadows and they are all still in great shape.

That's exactly what I used to do! Except I used a paintbrush from a local craft store and water and that worked just fine. Well, until my cat chewed up the paintbrush. She likes them. Too bad I'd cleaned it and it wasn't too toxic for her...:spy:

Anyway, even dampening a small section of the shadow should work out fine for people (like if you want to do a whole eyelid with wet color for more intensity) as long as you take care not to wet the whole shadow, which can definitely ruin them, especially the cheaper ones. I ruined my favorite Maybelline compact when I was younger because I wet a big spot in the middle to line my eyes and then could never get much of any color to come up after that. (I hadn't thought to scrape the top, that probably would've fixed it...)
 

DaizyDeath

New member
also to add to the why to not wet your shadows list

1. it uses up ALOT more shadow when you wet it.
2. it causes them to crease more easily
3. the color wont last as long


really theirs no reason to wet shadow in my opinion if you want the color to be brighter you can always add more on.
 

kchan99

New member
Even when some shadows say that they can be used wet or dry, I never try to wet them. Has anyone had a problem with wetted shadow getting moldy?

Thanks.
 

sewpunk

New member
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaizyDeath
also to add to the why to not wet your shadows list

1. it uses up ALOT more shadow when you wet it.
2. it causes them to crease more easily
3. the color wont last as long


Good points!

I messed up my Embark bad with putting a wet brush to it.


And yes, I have had a shadow get moldy from water, it was Manic Painic Vampire Red... I miss that shadow.
 
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