Wetting shadows?

Willa

New member
I went to an INGLOT counter last week and the girl was telling me that I could use the e/s wet (wich I already know). And then she told me that if a crust appears, just put a scotch paper on it, rub a little, and when you remove it, the crust will come out.

But I don't know...
I guess I'm too afraid to ruin my e/s, so I wont try it
 

hollyca

New member
I wet my embark all the time without problems. Been doing it for years. However I do prefer gel eyeliners because they last longer.
 

erine1881

New member
Quote:
Originally Posted by ash10spro
what i do is take my brush and grab the color i would like to use wet. then using a spray bottle or my fix +, i spray the bristles to get them wet. then i proceed to either line/ intensify/ etc. it saves you from having to dip a wet brush into your eyeshadow, making it crusty and a breeding ground for bacteria. HTH =)

this is what i do to. it doesn't ruin the shadow this way.

sometimes wetting the brush then dipping can leave a film, sometimes it doesn't. but, just because the shadow looks normal doesn't mean it is. what happens with the regular shadows is that the moisture disappears from the top (this is what makes people think its fine), but it sinks into the bottom layer. this moisture then breeds bacteria in the bottom layer, which grows and contaminates the entire shadow. by just using one edge of the shadow wet doesn't change this fact. this is what's great about the MSF shadows. they can be used wet directly, with no worry of bacteria growth.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Repunzel
i would appreciate if some1 could help me.my mineralize skinfinish natural has gone rock hard.u can't even swatch it nothing comes off.it happened a month into use.i can put my nail into it and its solid.(i have long acrylics)my daisy chain e/s it also getting a shell on 1 corner.ideas?
i never put water on them.and the tape idea will not work for me its just 2 hard.
can i fix it?return it?.why did it happen?.
any help would be great thx.


this hard layer is caused by the oils in your skin. the best way to get rid of it is to take a butter knife or mascara wand and gently scrape that layer off. the rest will be good until it happens agains again, then just repeat the process.

to keep it from happening too often, clean your brushes inbetween uses so that there isn't a buildup of oils from your skin.
 

ckara

New member
Quote:
Originally Posted by shinypixiedust
Has anyone actually used an MSf with a wet brush? I just bought a couple and I'm scared to try! hehe

Sometimes when I use my MSF Natural, I'll get some powder on my 182 or 183 kabuki (depending how much coverage I want), spritz a little fix+ on and apply. Then I'll wipe my brush on some paper towels in a circle to remove moisture and get some more MSF on the brush, if need be, and repeat. It creates a really nice effect.
 

erine1881

New member
Quote:
Originally Posted by ckara
Sometimes when I use my MSF Natural, I'll get some powder on my 182 or 183 kabuki (depending how much coverage I want), spritz a little fix+ on and apply. Then I'll wipe my brush on some paper towels in a circle to remove moisture and get some more MSF on the brush, if need be, and repeat. It creates a really nice effect.

MSF can be used wet with no problems. MSFN aren't supposed to be used wet. just an FYI.
 

Repunzel

New member
Thanks i'll give it a go,but i think the msf is 2 far gone is a solid rock lol.i clean my brushes once a week.but it could be from when i use my 187 with liquid and then use it on msf,i wipe it down but it could have been slightly wet.i don't really want to wash them every day.
 

statusmode

New member
I personally never dip a wet brush into my shadows because I have also noticed that crust that forms as it dries, but what I do is load the color onto a dry brush, and then either spray the brush directly with fix plus or mixing medium. (travel sized spray bottles really come in handy)
 

YSLGuy

New member
I have worked with Laura Mercier were they do the flatlining on the inside part along the upper lashline with a wet brush and thier cake liner.

I was wondering about doing that with a MAC shadow because the look is very nice actually.

I think it might be best to scrape some of the shadow off to a plate or something. Spray water on the back of the hand or whatever and dip the brush in the water and then into the shadow????
 

Monsterbilly

New member
I hate getting my makeup wet, but there are some products that are meant to be used wet.
Well, i always use pancake as a eyeshadow, but never actually used it wet until i bought a different brand that didn't show up on my skin (maybe it was because of the colour, not the brand, who knows)... then i thought i might give the wet makeup a shot and WOW!!!
I heard that's the same thing with kryolan uv palette, the colours only show up when it's wet (don't know if that's true, never used kryolan)
Ok, so the thing is, if you can use the eyeshadow dry, do it. Since i like vibrant colours (and its hard to find it in Brazil) i have to use pancake, and yes, unfortunatly it has to be wet.
 

Distinque

New member
wetting eyeshadows intensifies the pigmentation of them so that's why I think majority of people do it. A couple of weeks ago I had go to a Mac Studio Class where we would put the makeup on ourselves using the products and tools provided by Mac. A cool trick that they did was they got a kleenex for each guest on that table and they would rub the kleenex on to the eyeshadow/powder foundation and give it to us. I thought this trick was cool because it keeps the main pot sanitary. So the kleenex would be my pot of eyeshadow.

Another trick is to grab as much eyeshadow as needed on to the brush and spray the brush with fix+. Of course no double dipping!

I think the whole kleenex thing is cool. I'll be using this trick when I do people's makeup!

Hope this helps
 

Monsterbilly

New member
Quote:
Originally Posted by Distinque

Another trick is to grab as much eyeshadow as needed on to the brush and spray the brush with fix+. Of course no double dipping!


Usually to outline the eyes I take the eyeshadow with a dry brush and dip it in a drop of water but i never get enough eyeshadow on the brush to do that in both eyes if I want to use as an eyeshadow, not an eyeliner.
But anyway, i don't like to get the brush wet either

I've been using those crappy sponges that comes with cheap eyeshadows for that
 

BEA2LS

New member
i havent wet my shadows in a while but i used to dip my eyeliner brush in visine (the eye drops) and use a small corner. I always did this with beauty marked because i could not get it to look right when it was dry.
i have no idea if the eye drop thing is even safe, heh but i used to love the way it looked.

Edit: I stopped the visine thing when I began to get into paints. It doesn't work as well but it's a lot easier and less messy.
 

cmonster

New member
usually its better to get your product (eyeshadow) onto a brush and then add moisture. Like others have said before, if you apply a wet brush to your shadow pan the top layer can often crust. Also by adding moisture to the product you are risking higher chances of contaminating your shadows or any product since moisture often attracts bacteria growth. What you can do is maybe use a fine-misting spray bottle to wet your brush after you've gotten some of the product on your brush. If you don't want to do that then just make sure that your shadow pan has time to dry and the wipe off the top layer with a tissue
 

jennyjen1

New member
One of the things that sold me on a couple of MAC shadows was because the girl at the counter showed me what they looked like when they were used wet as a liner. She used it as a selling point for those particular shades. It worked great for the ones that I bought from her and I continue to use those colors wet because it makes them have a really nice vibrant sheen to them, and they stay put really well. But I've tried it with other colors I've bought since then and it doesn't work so well on all of them. For me it seems to work nicest on the shimmery and metallic shadows.
 

perfecttenn

New member
Quote:
Originally Posted by shabdebaz
Ok, I heard a coworker of mine telling a customer today not to wet the shadows as this could ruin them. I thought applying shadows wet was a common practice -- either for applying a more intense colour or for lining the eyes. What's the deal??

I would recommend spraying your brush with a mixing medium, just to damped it a bit. This way you won't dampen the shadow to the point where you could potentially alter the finish. Most mineral e/s can be used wet with out an altering to the finish, however other finishes you might just have to judge from a case by case standpoint. Try the shadow dry before wetting, that way you get a good idea of it you need to wet it or not.
 

zipperfire

New member
I use a small brush for lining, and wet it and run it around the rim of the shadow to not ruin the rest of it. When I want the entire shadow wet, I actually pack it on and then use a dampened finger over it afterwards.
 

Mabelle

New member
as an unoffcial rule, i will put a wet brush into a chunk luster (ie beauty marked) it doenst alter the finish (imo). For everything else, i pack my brush with product and spraywith fix +.
having the pressed product come into contact with wetness can create a yucky crust. I did that to my sketch and itdoesnt apply as nicely.
 

User38

New member
Are you guys referring to Mac prods? I have no problem with my pro products as far as wetting them -- I use a damp brush on any product and it dries perfectly. MAC Studio in powder should not be wet tho.. it does get a crust. If you really want a wet/dry product, try the Laura Geller blushes and ES.. they can be totally wet or dry.
 
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